Proyecto Mas Color is a campaign to promote the awareness of the lack of representation of Afro-Latinos and other minority groups in Latin American media.
"My name is Victoria Arzu and my sister Sophia and I are the founders of Proyecto Mas Color, an awareness campaign. We are petitioning Univision and Telemundo to include Afro-Latinos in their daily programming. Please take a look at our video… http://youtu.be/xoynWkeColI
And please sign our petition: http://www.change.org/petitions/univision-telemundo-include-more-afro-latinos-in-their-daily-programming ”

Proyecto Mas Color is a campaign to promote the awareness of the lack of representation of Afro-Latinos and other minority groups in Latin American media.

"My name is Victoria Arzu and my sister Sophia and I are the founders of Proyecto Mas Color, an awareness campaign. We are petitioning Univision and Telemundo to include Afro-Latinos in their daily programming. Please take a look at our video… http://youtu.be/xoynWkeColI

And please sign our petition: http://www.change.org/petitions/univision-telemundo-include-more-afro-latinos-in-their-daily-programming ”

Photos from the AfroLatin@ Forum’s Short Film Night in February! 

First row: Gabriela Watson, Nosotros AfroPeruanosMilton Guity and Wes Guity, I am GarifunaDash Harris, Mujer Afro, AfroLatino Forum; Raquel Casilla, AfroLatino Forum, Pamela Sporn, Cuban Roots/Bronx Stories

Back row: AfroLatino Forum members: Michael Lopez, Yamila Sterling, Ryan Hamilton 

Upcoming events:

2nd Annual Afro-Latino Festival of New York -  Saturday, June 28, Brooklyn, NY

Diasporic Dialogues - Thursday, July 24, 2014, Lincoln Center, NY

Stay updated here

Photo Credit: Kim Haas - losafrolatinos.com 

Black History Month: New Generation Of Afro-Latinos Tackles Race And Identity
Afro-Latin@ Shorts - Film Screening | Friday, February, 28 6:30pm-8:30pm

The AfroLatin@ Forum will screen a series of short films representing various perspectives on AfroDescendants across Latin America, Central and South America, and the Caribbean.

These films span a variety of themes and topics but are united in highlighting and celebrating aspects of Afro-Latin@ histories, cultures, and traditions. 

CALL FOR PAPERS: “Where Are the AfroLatin@s in the Classroom?”

The AfroLatin@ Forum welcomes submission of abstracts for our upcoming conference Afro-Latin@s Now! Race Counts scheduled for October 23-25, 2014. We are looking for papers for the following panel: "Where Are the AfroLatin@s in the Classroom?". This panel will create an engaging dialogue centered on strategies to help identify, manage, and contribute to the number of Afro-Latin@s in classrooms across the United States. For more information on the panel, read below.

Individual abstracts should be 250 words or less and must relate to the issue of Education as stated in the panel description below. Abstracts should be submitted by Monday, April 14, 2014.

Please submit papers here

The Afro-Latin@ Forum will host Afro-Latin@s Now!: Race Counts, a three-day international conference in 2014 focusing on Afro-Latino communities in the United States and transnational relations between Afro-descendant communities in Latin America and the Caribbean.Building on our immensely successful 2011 conference (“Afro-Latin@s Now!: Strategies for Visibility and Action”), the Forum will bring together activists, cultural workers, community members, academics and other stakeholders representing the vast, diverse Afro-Latino population to consolidate networks, advance common educational and advocacy projects, and chart out a strategy for future collaborative work. The conference, co-sponsored by local and national organizations and institutions with whom we have long-standing collaborative relations, will occur on October 23-25, 2014, at three New York City venues: The Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture, The CUNY Graduate Center, and El Museo del Barrio.The theme of the Afro-Latin@s Now!: Race Counts conference is the critical importance of quantifying the U.S. Afro-Latino population, which is subject to endemic and systemic “invisibility” in the United States census, the media, and public and political discourse on raceand ethnicity domestically and internationally. Because of this lack of visibility and pervasive confusion about race and ethnicity stemming from the legacy of ideological and structural racism, “Black” and “Latino” are overwhelmingly represented as mutually exclusive. The reality is, however, they are often one and the same. African descendants are one-third of Latin America’s population, and for the millions of Latinos of African descent in the U.S., gathering data about this demographic will have an impact on health and access to healthcare, education, housing, employment, and political representation.This conference will provide an extraordinary opportunity to examine and contextualize these core issues of Afro-Latino identity, visibility and representation.Preceding Afro-Latin@s Now! Race Counts will be a series of preparatory public programs. These activities, as well as the conference and possible post-conference programs, will expose participants to successful community building and social change actions employed throughout the hemisphere, and generate new strategies specific to our national and regional contexts. 
More info: http://www.afrolatinoforum.org/afro-latinos-now—-race-counts.html

The Afro-Latin@ Forum will host Afro-Latin@s Now!: Race Counts, a three-day international conference in 2014 focusing on Afro-Latino communities in the United States and transnational relations between Afro-descendant communities in Latin America and the Caribbean.

Building on our immensely successful 2011 conference (“Afro-Latin@s Now!: Strategies for Visibility and Action”), the Forum will bring together activists, cultural workers, community members, academics and other stakeholders representing the vast, diverse Afro-Latino population to consolidate networks, advance common educational and advocacy projects, and chart out a strategy for future collaborative work. The conference, co-sponsored by local and national organizations and institutions with whom we have long-standing collaborative relations, will occur on October 23-25, 2014, at three New York City venues: The Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture, The CUNY Graduate Center, and El Museo del Barrio.

The theme of the Afro-Latin@s Now!: Race Counts conference is the critical importance of quantifying the U.S. Afro-Latino population, which is subject to endemic and systemic “invisibility” in the United States census, the media, and public and political discourse on raceand ethnicity domestically and internationally. Because of this lack of visibility and pervasive confusion about race and ethnicity stemming from the legacy of ideological and structural racism, “Black” and “Latino” are overwhelmingly represented as mutually exclusive. The reality is, however, they are often one and the same. African descendants are one-third of Latin America’s population, and for the millions of Latinos of African descent in the U.S., gathering data about this demographic will have an impact on health and access to healthcare, education, housing, employment, and political representation.

This conference will provide an extraordinary opportunity to examine and contextualize these core issues of Afro-Latino identity, visibility and representation.

Preceding Afro-Latin@s Now! Race Counts will be a series of preparatory public programs. These activities, as well as the conference and possible post-conference programs, will expose participants to successful community building and social change actions employed throughout the hemisphere, and generate new strategies specific to our national and regional contexts. 

More info: http://www.afrolatinoforum.org/afro-latinos-now—-race-counts.html

The Afrolatin@ Forum is in Solidarity with those affected by the 168-13 ruling of the Constitutional Court of the Dominican Republic

negrodocumentary:

"The second part of my family’s narrative around race is that historically it hasn’t been enforced… finding your native grandmother or your black grandfather is not something that you are looking for right, you’re looking for whiteness you’re looking for some kind of way to alleviate your own oppression and often that means a history of whiteness, that’s just the way that Latin Americans work…because what does that mean… it means better job opportunities, it means that… ‘you’re not supposed to be here,’ you’re not supposed to be poor…  you were once in Europe and you were once someone who had status… Racism is a hell of a drug and I shouldn’t just say racism, but white supremacy let’s be more specific. I think that people throw around the word ‘racism’ and they don’t know what it means, but white supremacist values in Latin America are very strong. They’re very strong."

Ecuadorian-American, Blanca E. Vega discusses her journey in uncovering her racial identity. From growing up as a “zambita,” to discovering the AfroAmerindian maroon republic in Ecuador, to seeing herself in an AfroEcuadorian enslaved woman who fought for her freedom through the legal system, Blanca was searching for racial completeness beyond pervasive whiteness. Read her blog on the topic: 

Finding Maria Chiquinquira — On the Road to Racial Completeness

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Anonymous said: Is Afro-latin@ used when someone looks black but is latin@? Or have some black yet mainly latin@?

reclaimingthelatinatag:

AfroLatin@ is a person from or of Latin American descent that is of African ancestry. There are 150 million+ Afrodescendants in Latin America, about a third of the population. 

'Black' and 'Afrodescendant' ie-AfroColombian, AfroDominican, AfroPeruvian is an identity that is personal and may be political, for visibility and human rights purposes. African ancestry is a fact. In so much of my research, it varies. One may proudly identify as say, AfroPeruvian but reject the term 'Black' because it was [still is, depending on context] used as a tool of subjugation and dehumanization. Some have said 'Black' does not signify a country or origin but rather colonialism.

Also important to point out, you do not have to “look” like you have African ancestry to have it. 95% of enslaved Africans went to Latin America and the Caribbean. Africans have been in Latin America for hundreds of years, same as Europeans, and there has been generations of mixing. Very multi-layered topic. 

The AfroLatin@ Forum is a good resource to learn more:

Why make the distinction between Latin@s and AfroLatin@s? Aren’t we all just Latin@s?

Identification as an “AfroLatin@” acknowledges the racial diversity among Latin Americans, Caribbeans and Latin@s and the historical, political, and social particularities that characterize the experiences of people of African descent throughout the Americas. By self-consciously identifying as AfroLatin@ we assert our cultural/ethnic origins AND our membership in the African diasporic community. “Black” and “Latin@” are not mutually exclusive identities - AfroLatin@s belong to both groups.
The AfroLatin@ Reader - History and Culture in the United States 
edited by Forum executive director Miriam Jiménez Román and Juan Flores 

The AfroLatin@ Reader - History and Culture in the United States 

edited by Forum executive director Miriam Jiménez Román and Juan Flores